“Invasion of human tissue by abnormal, proliferating, genetically altered tapeworm cells is a novel disease mechanism that links Parasite causes cancer in maninfection and cancer.” – New England Journal of Medicine

There are many theories as to why some people get cancer, and some don’t. Science has yet to determine without a shadow of a doubt the exact cause of most cancers.

Personally, my own extensive research into this ancient disease keeps leading me back to one of earth’s oldest creatures. An organism that lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits by deriving nutrients at the host’s expense. A tiny creature that every single human and animal carries within their bodies, blood and organs.

This ancient organism is known as the parasite.

The New England Journal of Medicine recently reported on a 41 year old man from Columbia who died not from his own cancer, but the cancer of a parasite known as the tapeworm that was living within his body.

The patient was unable to be treated by the time doctors had identified the cancer, and died three days after the worm DNA was discovered. The parasitic DNA came from the dwarf tapeworms, known as Hymenlopis nana.

The abstract from the Journal reads as follows:

“Neoplasms occur naturally in invertebrates but are not known to develop in tapeworms. We observed nests of monomorphic, undifferentiated cells in samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies in a man infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

The morphologic features and invasive behavior of the cells were characteristic of cancer, but their small size suggested a nonhuman origin.

A polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay targeting eukaryotes identified Hymenolepis nana DNA. Although the cells were unrecognizable as tapeworm tissue, immunohistochemical staining and probe hybridization labeled the cells in situ. Comparative deep sequencing identified H. nana structural genomic variants that are compatible with mutations described in cancer. Invasion of human tissue by abnormal, proliferating, genetically altered tapeworm cells is a novel disease mechanism that links infection and cancer.”

Read more about this research @ New England Journal of Medicine.